Thursday, April 28, 2011

ANOA PINDAD 1:35


the APS-3 "Anoa" (Indonesian: Angkut Personel Sedang, English: Medium Personnel Carrier) is a 6x6 armoured personnel carrier developed by PT Pindad of Indonesia. The APS-3 is named after the Anoa, which is a type of buffalo indigenous to Indonesia. The prototype was first unveiled at the 61st anniversary of TNI on October 5, 2006 in TNI HQ at Cilangkap, south of capital Jakarta.[1][2]
The Pindad APS-3 had been officially unveiled to the public at the Indo Defence & Aerospace 2008 exhibition on November 19, 2008[3] to November 22, 2008[4] after being shown in a TNI parade on October 5, 2008.[5] On August 30, 2008, 10 APS-3's have been produced[6] with the plan of having 150 vehicles to be produced for the Indonesian Army[7][8] in time for their first deployment in 2009.[9] 20 of the Pansers were handed over to the Indonesian government through the Defense Ministry, part of a deal from the initial 150 vehicles to 40 due to the economic crisis.[10] 40 Pansers were delivered as part of PT Pindad's commitment to the total delivery of 154 Pansers.[11] 33 Pansers were eventually submitted to the Ministry of Defence on January 13, 2010.[12] Pindad had received loans from state-owned Bank Mandiri, Bank BNI 46 and Bank BRI as part of payments for the manufacture of the Pansers.[10]

Development

The development history of the Pindad Panser was started in 2003 as a result of increased military intervention in the Aceh province. During the conflict, the Indonesian Army put forward urgent requirements for an armored personnel carrier for the transport of troops.
Pindad responded to this requirement in 2004, with the APR-1V (Angkut Personel Ringan)[13]Izuzu truck chassis. 14 vehicles were built by Pindad and were sent to Aceh for evaluation and combat trials. However, the follow-on orders for another 26 vehicles were canceled following the 2004 tsunami. a 4x4 armored vehicle based on a commercial
Pindad continued the APC development program with assistance from the Agency For Assessment and Application of Technology or BPPT in 2005.[14] The next prototype was the APS-1 (Angkut Personel Sedang), a 6x6 design that was again based on a commercial Perkasa truck platform by PT Texmaco.[15] Although it was not selected for production, the experience gained in developing the APS-1 convinced the Indonesian Army to give the go-ahead by Pindad to develop the next generation of Panser vehicles, the APS-2 at a production cost of 600 million rupiah or US$60,000 each.source




well this one it's very special for me, over one year to completed just I can't found the right timing and feel...yup got to fix it out now...here some late 3d progress
testbuild time



























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Sunday, April 24, 2011

Cessna O-2 Skymaster 1:48

The O-2 Skymaster (also known as the "Oscar Deuce" or "The Duck") is a military version of the Cessna 337 Super Skymaster utilized as an observation and forward air control (FAC) aircraft. The United States Air Force commissioned Cessna to build a military variant to replace the O-1 Bird Dog in 1966.

Design and development

As with the civilian version, the Skymaster was a low cost twin-engine piston powered aircraft, with one engine in the nose of the aircraft and a second engine in the rear of the fuselage. The push-pull configuration meant a simpler single-engine operating procedure due to centerline thrust compared to the common low-wing mounting of most twin engine light planes, and also allowed for a high wing, providing clear observation below and behind the aircraft. During the Vietnam War, the Skymaster was intended to be replaced in the forward air control (FAC) mission by the OV-10 Bronco, but the O-2A maintained a night mission role after the OV-10's introduction due to the OV-10's high level of cockpit illumination, rendering night reconnaissance impractical.[1] The O-2 was phased out completely after additional OV-10 night upgrades.[2][3]
The first O-2 flew in January 1967 and the plane went into production shortly thereafter, with the USAF taking delivery in March 1967. A total of 532 O-2s were built in two variants for the USAF by 1970. The O-2A served as a FAC aircraft with the 20th Tactical Air Support Squadron, while the O-2B was equipped with loudspeakers and a leaflet dispenser for use in the psychological operations (PSYOPS) role. Several USAF O-2 aircraft were later transferred to and operated by the former VNAF South Vietnamese Air Force.[3]
Following the Vietnam War, the O-2 continued to operate with both U.S. Air Force and Air National Guard units well into the late 1980s. Six former USAF O-2A airframes were also transferred to the U.S. Navy in 1983 for use as "range controllers" with Attack Squadron 122A-7 Corsair II at Naval Air Station Lemoore, California. These same aircraft were later transferred to Strike Fighter Squadron 125VFA-125), the F/A-18 Hornet FRS at NAS Lemoore, in 1986 for use in the same range control role.[4] (VA-122), the Pacific Fleet Replacement Squadron for the (
The six Navy O-2A's remained in this role until September 1990, when they were replaced by T-34C Turbo Mentor aircraft transferred from the Naval Air Training Command. Four of the Navy O-2A aircraft were retired and two of these became civil registered in October 1991. These two aircraft were flown in U.S. airshows performing a "Viet Nam Warbird COIN/FAC" routine during the 1990s. The routine debuted at the "Wings Over Houston" (Texas) airshow in October 1991.[citation needed]
Of the six USN aircraft mentioned above, two were transferred to the U.S. Army in late 1990.[4] O-2As had originally entered the U.S. Army's inventory in 1967 from USAF stocks and were augmented by the 1990 aircraft transfer from the U.S. Navy. Several disassembled USAF O-2s remain in storage at Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona.[4] Two O-2As were used at Laguna Army Airfield, Arizona as part of testing programs carried out by the Yuma Proving Ground. These were retired in October 2010 and sent to a museum. source
3d modelling



testbuilt


 body assembly


 landing gear assembly
tail assembly

rocket tube, props, landing gear and tail









 give lead (ex/nail) inside the fuselage to maintain the balance





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